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Security in Context: The BeyondTrust Blog

Welcome to Security in Context

Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

You Lock Your Cars And Homes- Why Not Your Enterprise?

Posted January 25, 2012    Peter McCalister

There are some things in life that are valuable and vitally important to our success and safety. Things like cars and homes, for example. They are important assets that aren’t to be left open for just anyone to access. You don’t think twice about locking them and taking precautions to protect them from thieves, intruders, or even your teenage daughter.

This same concept applies to the information within our enterprises, as well. As IT professionals, our job and responsibility is to protect critical information for the companies that we work for. And just like we do for our cars and our homes, we need to take every precaution to lock and protect the data that has been entrusted to us. The best way to do this is through the least privilege model.

Over and over again, we see the media report on examples of people who did not take correct measures to lock their sensitive information. For example, Loma Linda University Medical Center had a breach because employees illegally took documents from the office to their homes. Stoz Friedberg had one as well, when two customer service representatives diverted checks from client accounts for their own use. Another example is a programmer, working for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, stole $10 million dollars worth of proprietary software code.

Clearly locking down sensitive information and the users that can access said information is a no-brainer. For a completely secure environment, it’s necessary. Least privilege, or giving users the least amount of access to do their jobs, is the most secure and compliant way to do this. Data should be protected from all employees and contractors that don’t absolutely need it, and those who do should be monitored closely.

To learn more about how to lock down your enterprise and keep your sensitive information secure from insiders, click here.

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Additional articles

How To Implement The Australian Signals Directorate’s Top 4 Strategies

Posted October 20, 2014    Morey Haber

The Australian Signals Directorate (ASD), also known as the Defence Signals Directorate, has developed a list of strategies to mitigate targeted cyber intrusions. The recommended strategies were developed through ASD’s extensive experience in operational cyber security, including responding to serious security intrusions and performing vulnerability assessments and penetration testing for Australian government agencies. These recommendations…

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asp-mvc

Exploiting MS14-059 because sometimes XSS is fun, sometimes…

Posted October 17, 2014    BeyondTrust Research Team

This October, Microsoft has provided a security update for System.Web.Mvc.dll which addresses a ‘Security Feature Bypass’. The vulnerability itself is in ASP.NET MVC technology and given its wide adoption we thought we would take a closer look. Referring to the bulletin we can glean a few useful pieces of information: “A cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability exists…

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4bestpracticesaudits-blog

Four Best Practices for Passing Privileged Account Audits

Posted October 16, 2014    Chris Burd

Like most IT organizations, your team may periodically face the “dreaded” task of being audited. Your process for delegating privileged access to desktops, servers, and infrastructure devices is a massive target for the auditor’s microscope. An audit’s findings can have significant implications on technology and business strategy, so it’s critical to make sure you’re prepared…

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