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Security in Context: The BeyondTrust Blog

Welcome to Security in Context

Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

You Lock Your Cars And Homes- Why Not Your Enterprise?

Posted January 25, 2012    Peter McCalister

There are some things in life that are valuable and vitally important to our success and safety. Things like cars and homes, for example. They are important assets that aren’t to be left open for just anyone to access. You don’t think twice about locking them and taking precautions to protect them from thieves, intruders, or even your teenage daughter.

This same concept applies to the information within our enterprises, as well. As IT professionals, our job and responsibility is to protect critical information for the companies that we work for. And just like we do for our cars and our homes, we need to take every precaution to lock and protect the data that has been entrusted to us. The best way to do this is through the least privilege model.

Over and over again, we see the media report on examples of people who did not take correct measures to lock their sensitive information. For example, Loma Linda University Medical Center had a breach because employees illegally took documents from the office to their homes. Stoz Friedberg had one as well, when two customer service representatives diverted checks from client accounts for their own use. Another example is a programmer, working for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, stole $10 million dollars worth of proprietary software code.

Clearly locking down sensitive information and the users that can access said information is a no-brainer. For a completely secure environment, it’s necessary. Least privilege, or giving users the least amount of access to do their jobs, is the most secure and compliant way to do this. Data should be protected from all employees and contractors that don’t absolutely need it, and those who do should be monitored closely.

To learn more about how to lock down your enterprise and keep your sensitive information secure from insiders, click here.

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Additional articles

PowerBroker for Unix & Linux helps prevent Shellshock

Posted September 25, 2014    Paul Harper

Like many other people who tinker with UNIX and Linux on a regular basis, BASH has always been my shell of choice.  Dating back to the early days moving from Windows to a non-Windows platform, mapping the keys correctly to allow easy navigation and control helped ensure an explosion of use for the shell. Unfortunately,…

Bash “Shellshock” Vulnerability – Retina Updates

Posted September 24, 2014    BeyondTrust Research Team

A major vulnerability was recently discovered within bash which allows arbitrary command execution via specially crafted environment variables. This is possible due to the fact that bash supports the assignment of shell functions to shell variables. When bash parses environment shell functions, it continues parsing even after the closing brace of the function definition. If…

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7 Reasons Customers Switch to Password Safe for Privileged Password Management

Posted September 24, 2014    Chris Burd

It’s clear that privileged password management tools are essential for keeping mission-critical data, servers and assets safe and secure. However, as I discussed in my previous post, there are several pitfalls to look out for when deploying a privileged password management solution. At this point, you may be wondering how BeyondTrust stacks up. With that,…

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