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Security in Context: The BeyondTrust Blog

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Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

You Lock Your Cars And Homes- Why Not Your Enterprise?

Posted January 25, 2012    Peter McCalister

There are some things in life that are valuable and vitally important to our success and safety. Things like cars and homes, for example. They are important assets that aren’t to be left open for just anyone to access. You don’t think twice about locking them and taking precautions to protect them from thieves, intruders, or even your teenage daughter.

This same concept applies to the information within our enterprises, as well. As IT professionals, our job and responsibility is to protect critical information for the companies that we work for. And just like we do for our cars and our homes, we need to take every precaution to lock and protect the data that has been entrusted to us. The best way to do this is through the least privilege model.

Over and over again, we see the media report on examples of people who did not take correct measures to lock their sensitive information. For example, Loma Linda University Medical Center had a breach because employees illegally took documents from the office to their homes. Stoz Friedberg had one as well, when two customer service representatives diverted checks from client accounts for their own use. Another example is a programmer, working for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, stole $10 million dollars worth of proprietary software code.

Clearly locking down sensitive information and the users that can access said information is a no-brainer. For a completely secure environment, it’s necessary. Least privilege, or giving users the least amount of access to do their jobs, is the most secure and compliant way to do this. Data should be protected from all employees and contractors that don’t absolutely need it, and those who do should be monitored closely.

To learn more about how to lock down your enterprise and keep your sensitive information secure from insiders, click here.

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Additional articles

Are Your Data Security Efforts Focused in the Right Area?

Posted January 28, 2015    Scott Lang

Vormetric Data Security recently released an insider threat report, with research conducted by HarrisPoll and analyzed by Ovum. Based on the survey responses, it is apparent that there is still a great deal of insecurity over data. However, the results also show that there may be misplaced investments to address those insecurities. I will explain…

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GHOST Vulnerability…Scary Indeed

Posted January 28, 2015    BeyondTrust Research Team

A vulnerability discovered by Qualys security researchers has surfaced within the GNU C Library that affects virtually all Linux operating systems. The vulnerability lies within the various gethostbyname*() functions and, as such, has been dubbed “GHOST.” GHOST is particularly nasty considering remote, arbitrary code execution can be achieved. In an effort to avoid taxing DNS lookups, glibc developers introduced…

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Your New Years Resolution: Controlling Privileged Users

Posted January 27, 2015    Dave Shackleford

Is 2015 the year you get a better handle on security? The news last year was grim – so much so, in fact, that many in the information security community despaired a bit. Really, the end-of-the-year infosec cocktail parties were a bit glum. OK, let’s be honest, infosec cocktail parties are usually not that wild…

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