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Security in Context: The BeyondTrust Blog

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Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

You Lock Your Cars And Homes- Why Not Your Enterprise?

Posted January 25, 2012    Peter McCalister

There are some things in life that are valuable and vitally important to our success and safety. Things like cars and homes, for example. They are important assets that aren’t to be left open for just anyone to access. You don’t think twice about locking them and taking precautions to protect them from thieves, intruders, or even your teenage daughter.

This same concept applies to the information within our enterprises, as well. As IT professionals, our job and responsibility is to protect critical information for the companies that we work for. And just like we do for our cars and our homes, we need to take every precaution to lock and protect the data that has been entrusted to us. The best way to do this is through the least privilege model.

Over and over again, we see the media report on examples of people who did not take correct measures to lock their sensitive information. For example, Loma Linda University Medical Center had a breach because employees illegally took documents from the office to their homes. Stoz Friedberg had one as well, when two customer service representatives diverted checks from client accounts for their own use. Another example is a programmer, working for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, stole $10 million dollars worth of proprietary software code.

Clearly locking down sensitive information and the users that can access said information is a no-brainer. For a completely secure environment, it’s necessary. Least privilege, or giving users the least amount of access to do their jobs, is the most secure and compliant way to do this. Data should be protected from all employees and contractors that don’t absolutely need it, and those who do should be monitored closely.

To learn more about how to lock down your enterprise and keep your sensitive information secure from insiders, click here.

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Additional articles

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How to Audit VMware ESX and ESXi Servers Against the VMware Hardening Guidelines with Retina CS

Posted February 27, 2015    BeyondTrust Research Team

Retina CS Enterprise Vulnerability Management has included advanced VMware auditing capabilities for some time, including virtual machine discovery and scanning through a cloud connection, plus the ability to scan ESX and ESXi hosts using SSH. However, in response to recent security concerns associated with SSH, VMware has disabled SSH by default in its more recent…

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Privileged Passwords: The Bane of Security Professionals Everywhere

Posted February 19, 2015    Dave Shackleford

Passwords have been with us since ancient times. Known as “watchwords”, ancient Roman military guards would pass a wooden tablet with a daily secret word engraved from one shift to the next, with each guard position marking the tablet to indicate it had been received. The military has been using passwords, counter-passwords, and even sound…

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Privileged Account Management Process

In Vulnerability Management, Process is King

Posted February 18, 2015    Morey Haber

You have a vulnerability scanner, but where’s your process? Most organizations are rightly concerned about possible vulnerabilities in their systems, applications, networked devices, and other digital assets and infrastructure components. Identifying vulnerabilities is indeed important, and most security professionals have some kind of scanning solution in place. But what is most essential to understand is…

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