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Security in Context: The BeyondTrust Blog

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Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

Who Controls Your Favorite Personal Computing Device?

Posted April 1, 2011    Peter McCalister

As a longtime Blackberry user I have been looking forward to the release of the Blackberry Playbook. With many of my colleagues using tablets, particularly iPads, I have been getting a little jealous of what they could do. So in addition to the excitement about RIM setting a release date I also noted the excitement about the announcement that the Playbook will support Android Apps.

That announcement also got me wondering if I can continue to be confident in the levels of security I have come to expect with my Blackberry. As a security conscious IT user, I always felt good about the enterprise quality security Blackberry provided. Even though I own my Blackberry Bold I figured I didn’t need to worry too much about anti-virus or add-on security software.  But the highly publicized problems with DroidDream malware highlighted the vulnerability of the Android platform without a least privilege solution.

It’s not that Android is particularly insecure. We have seen these kind of problems on desktops and servers. Control of access to the administrative account is a critical part of security on every platform. In fact Android has a well developed security model that includes application isolation and a fine-grained permission mechanism that enforces restrictions on the specific operations that a particular process can perform. These are advanced features that are considered best practices for desktop security.

The bigger problem these events point out is who has the responsibility for keeping personal computing devices secure. The increasingly popular bring your own comparer to work model seems like a good deal for everyone. You get to carry one device that fits you best and IT saves a lot of work buying and provisioning hardware. But what happens when you merge personal and business data and sometimes apps on employee owned devices? Who’s responsible for security and controls what applications run on the device? These aren’t easy questions, but ones that needs to be answered by every company that takes endpoint security seriously.

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New IT Security Best Practices for Maintaining “Business as Usual” Despite Evolving Threats

Posted August 13, 2014    Morey Haber

It’s time to get back to business. Here in the U.S., summer vacations are wrapping up and businesses are looking forward to closing out 2014. Over the past year, we’ve seen several incidents that warrant changes in the ways consumers make purchases and businesses conduct transactions. Consider last week’s theft of a whopping 1.2 billion…

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Retina Vulnerability Audits – August 2014 Patch Tuesday

Posted August 12, 2014    BeyondTrust Research Team

The following is a list of Retina vulnerability audits for this August 2014 Patch Tuesday: MS14-043 - Vulnerability in Windows Media Center Could Allow Remote Code Execution (2978742) 34924 – Microsoft WMC Remote Code Execution (2978742) MS14-044 - Vulnerabilities in SQL Server Could Allow Elevation of Privilege (2984340) 34915 – Microsoft SQL Server Multiple Vulnerabilities (2984340) – 2008 34916 –…

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August 2014 Patch Tuesday

Posted August 12, 2014    BeyondTrust Research Team

This August Microsoft has released nine security bulletins which account for a whole variety of critical vulnerabilities. The most critical bulletins are MS14-051 (Internet Explorer), MS14-045 (Kernel-mode), and MS14-049 (Windows Installer). MS14-043 fixes a critical code execution vulnerability within Windows Media Center (people still use that?). The vulnerability itself is specifically within a COM object…

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