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Top 10 Reasons To Implement Least Privilege for Linux Servers

Posted November 19, 2010    Peter McCalister

In the spirit of keeping blog posts informative, short and fun, this one takes a cue from David Letterman in format.  So without further fanfare or wasted space… the Top 10 Reasons to Implement Least Privilege on Linux Servers are:

#10 – Sam, the CSO can now sleep nights knowing that excess privileges will no longer be responsible for failing a SOX, HIPAA, PCI, DSS, GLBA or FDCC and FISMA audit (even though he isn’t required to even deal with the last two).

#9 – Andy the Auditor can get a full report of who has what entitlements instantly to satisfy compliance successfully, instead of taking weeks of manual effort

#8 – Ted in Tech Support won’t be able to reset file and directory permissions on any Linux server he has admin rights to so liberally that anyone with a login can access confidential data just because it makes his job easier

#7 - Sid in Development won’t be able to download Apache applications or any otherunauthorized open source “tools” potentially injecting malware into our corporate network

#6 - Fiona and Felix our new Linux administrators won’t make one, or more, of the 10 Mistakes New Linux Administrators Make

#5 – Vito, the ever-industrious programmer will no longer be able to code suid root binaries into his programs allowing programmatic access beyond what is allowed by corporate policy or regulatory requirements

#4 - Alice in IT will no longer be responsible for DNS misconfiguration errors as her role won’t facilitate this level of admin privilege

#3 - Fred in IT won’t be able to install a Trojan on the mission critical server, bringing it down for 4 hours and costing the company over $1M in lost transactions, because he was passed over for a big promotion

#2 - Sarah, the CIO will no longer have to hide Linux root credentials in a sealed envelope in her office safe and deal with a manual check in/check out process

#1 – Tony, the Palo Alto Linux administrator will no longer be able to wear that ratty old T-shirt with the slogan “Bow before me, for I am root” any longer

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Posted November 20, 2014    BeyondTrust Research Team

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Password Game Show

Managing Shared Accounts for Privileged Users: 5 Best Practices for Achieving Control and Accountability

Posted November 20, 2014    Scott Lang

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Triggering MS14-066

Triggering MS14-066

Posted November 17, 2014    BeyondTrust Research Team

Microsoft addressed CVE-2014-6321 this Patch Tuesday, which has been hyped as the next Heartbleed.  This vulnerability (actually at least 2 vulnerabilities) promises remote code execution in applications that use the SChannel Security Service Provider, such as Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS). The details have been scarce.  Lets fix that. Looking at the bindiff of schannel.dll, we see a…

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