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Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

The Retina Protection Agent Part II

Posted September 10, 2010    Morey Haber

Part of being a good product manager is keeping an eye on your competition with a lifecycle development approach in mind. This considers whether the competition is expanding their product line outside of the solutions core competency and if the maturity requires rapid development and feature releases. At the end of lifecycle, the solution becomes End of Life (EoL) and dropped as a product. For standalone Host Intrusion Prevention Solutions (HIPS), the grim reaper is just around the corner.

Consider that Cisco has announced EoS (End of Sale) and EoL dates for the Cisco Security Agent and this agent was based on an acquisition of Okena in 2003, HIPS has had a relatively short life of seven years as a standalone enterprise product. Gartner, in their recent 2010 IT Market Clock for Infrastructure Protection, has also indicated that HIPS has passed the “Dusk of Obsolesce” for personal computers. So what technology is replacing HIPS to combat modern day threats?

For starters, the concept of a host-based intrusion prevention as a standalone tool has lost its value as a single agent technology solution. It targets protocol, service, and network based vulnerabilities and their accompanying exploits as a prevention product. With trends indicating that threats are evolving to web applications and client side attacks, HIPS becomes an older (but required) piece of a much larger puzzle. This is where the Retina Protection Agent (and its parent solution Blink Professional) become the next viable solution for organizations.

As I indicated above, products either mature and die like CSA, or they evolve to meet current challenges. These challenges can warrant new features, platform support, or even just updates to the workflow for simplification and usability. The Retina Protection Agent has exceeded the requirements of being a basic HIPS solution by supporting the latest Microsoft operating systems, adding key features for local agent-based vulnerability assessment to detect which client applications are vulnerability, and a new Management Console, Retina CS, to simplify the deployment and administration of this agent-based technology.

Host Intrusion Prevent Solutions may be at the end of their useful lives, but the need to protect the desktop is as important as ever. The threats have evolved and therefore the technology must evolve to meet these threats. eEye is ahead of the curve and our products will exceed your expectations for Unified Vulnerability Management from Assessment, Mitigation, to Endpoint Protection.

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Additional articles

CyberResiliency

6 things I like about Gartner’s Cyber Resiliency Strategy

Posted August 27, 2015    Nigel Hedges

There were 6 key principles, or recommendations, that Gartner suggested were important drivers towards a great cyber resiliency posture. I commented more than once during the conference that many of these things were not new. They are all important recommendations that are best when placed together and given to senior management and the board – a critical element of organisations that desperately need to “get it”.

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powerbroker-difference-1

Why Customers Choose PowerBroker: Flexible Deployment Options

Posted August 26, 2015    Scott Lang

BeyondTrust commissioned a study of our customer base in early 2015 to determine how we are different from other alternatives in the market. What we learned was that there were six key differentiators that separate BeyondTrust from other solution providers in the market. We call it the PowerBroker difference,

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Mac-Security-Enterprise

On Demand Webinar: Security Risk of Mac OS X in the Enterprise

Posted August 20, 2015    BeyondTrust Software

In the last several years, Mac administrators have come to realize that they may be just as vulnerable to exploits and malware as most other operating systems. New malware and adware is released all the time, and there have been serious vulnerabilities patched by Apple in the past several years, some of which may afford attackers full control of your systems.

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