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Security in Context: The BeyondTrust Blog

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Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

Mobile Workers Require Setting Boundaries vs Building Walls

Posted November 24, 2010    Peter McCalister

Although corporate networks today are increasingly open to subcontractors, partners or affiliates, or simply a workforce on the move, the tendency is still to think of security in the same way castles were defended in the middle ages, by building bigger walls – higher, wider and with more built in obstacles.

Indeed, a recent report Borderless Security, has reached similar conclusions – a combination of more mobility, increased social access to information and outsourcing to the cloud requires a change in traditional information security paradigms.

The reports authors add: “People and organizations outside the borders of the traditional corporate environment – play a role in helping to achieve information security objectives, but can also pose a risk to protecting your information.”

Today, personal mobile devices are used regularly by employees for business and to connect to the network, and while known as a vulnerable attack surface for malware, employees are increasingly willing to communicate with each other via social networking sites.

According to Symantec, workers are 35 percent more likely to violate corporate surfing policies when they are on the road, rather than in the office.

While Computerworld also reports that mobile workers are more than five times as likely to trigger blocks relating to prohibited downloads.

Obviously, when we talk about desktops today, it doesn’t just mean the number of MDF bureaus in your building.

So, with so many potential points of entry to sensitive data, so many different attack surfaces from which infection can happen, the shift in perspective required is to think less about building walls and more about establishing clear boundaries.

Employee at their desk or on the move, subcontractor or partner, access to the network should be the same.  When we talk about privileged access, it’s not who is more privileged than who, in terms of their relationship to the company, it simply refers to who gets access to what as defined by their role definition.

As the straight lines of traditional security practice get increasingly blurred and permeable, privilege access, becomes the cornerstone of not just good network security but also good people management.

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Additional articles

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New Analyst SWOT Assessment Identifies Key Strengths of PowerBroker

Posted November 24, 2014    Scott Lang

Following on the heels of the Gartner PAM market guide and Frost & Sullivan review of Password Safe comes a new analyst review of our BeyondInsight and PowerBroker platforms, a SWOT assessment of BeyondTrust written by Ovum. Ovum’s honest and thorough review of BeyondTrust indicates that we are delivering, “…an integrated, one-stop approach to PAM….

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Patented Windows privilege management brings you unmatched benefits

Posted November 24, 2014    Scott Lang

We are pleased to announce that BeyondTrust has been granted a new U.S. Patent (No. 8,850,549) for privilege management, validating our approach to helping our customers achieve least privilege in Windows environments. The methods and systems that we employ for controlling access to resources and privileges per process are unique to BeyondTrust PowerBroker for Windows….

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A Quick Look at MS14-068

Posted November 20, 2014    BeyondTrust Research Team

Microsoft recently released an out of band patch for Kerberos.  Taking a look at the Microsoft security bulletin, it seems like there is some kind of issue with Kerberos signatures related to tickets. Further information is available in the Microsoft SRD Blogpost So it looks like there is an issue with PAC signatures.  But what…

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