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Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

Microsoft Vulnerabilities & Admin Privileges

Posted January 28, 2011    Peter McCalister

Some of you may have already seen the annual report we do each year on vulnerabilities in Microsoft products. Our last report found that in 90% of critical vulnerabilities could be mitigated with the removal of administrative rights.

This presents three sources of risks to Windows desktops in a business environment:

  • Users that are slow to download the latest patches leave their PCs vulnerable
  • Discovered vulnerabilities that have not yet been patched
  • Vulnerabilities Microsoft is not yet aware of, but there is some awareness in the hacker community

But alas, today a Computerworld article highlights the trouble with relying on Microsoft patches alone to protect PCs from Microsoft vulnerabilities. Microsoft pulled a December 14th Outlook patch after it caused several performance issues on PCs that downloaded it, reissuing a fixed patch over a  month later.

This means PCs were left unpatched for at least a month and Computerworld reveals, this isn’t the first time. Microsoft’s own blog post responding to a recent FTP vulnerability in Windows 7 seems to indicate that they may not be patching it:

“We’ll continue to investigate this issue and, if necessary, we‘ll take appropriate action to help protect customers.”

I don’t blame Microsoft. They work hard, push out a lot of patches and fix critical vulnerabilities as quickly as possible. But when you’re talking about several suites of software that are amongst the most common applications on the desktop, that’s a big target and a lot of software.

No vendor could possibly keep up with it, but that’s why the organizations has to remove administrative rights to protect themselves under the real-world circumstance of prolific vulnerabilities.

 

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Implementing Least Privilege for Windows the Easy Way

Posted July 31, 2014    Morey Haber

The concept of least privilege states that asset users should have the lowest level of access privileges required to effectively conduct their jobs. Implementing least privilege can bring several benefits to your organization, including: Increased security by reducing the attack surface available to users and to potential attackers who compromise user systems via phishing, malware,…

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gartner market guide image - aug 2014

Introducing the Gartner Market Guide for Privileged Account Management

Posted July 29, 2014    Chris Burd

Gartner recently released a new Market Guide for Privileged Account Management (PAM), and we’d like to share a complimentary copy with you. The report includes PAM market analysis and direction, vendor overviews, and recommendations for selecting PAM solutions for your environment. BeyondTrust is one of two representative vendors (out of 20) to address all solution…

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Integrating Least Privilege and Password Management to Solve Account Security Challenges

Integrating Least Privilege and Password Management to Solve Account Security Challenges

Posted July 24, 2014    Morey Haber

There is a reason all BeyondTrust Privileged Account Management (PAM) solutions share the PowerBroker name: They all inherently enable you to reduce user-based risk and can be integrated under a centralized IT risk management platform. Here’s one common use case that demonstrates how this integration changes the playing field. Consider the challenge of privileged access:…

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