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Security in Context: The BeyondTrust Blog

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Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

Least Privilege and Windows 7 Compatibility

Posted December 22, 2010    Peter McCalister

In planning the move to Windows 7, Application Compatibility should be a top priority. The key technology that Microsoft provides for this is the Application Compatibility Toolkit (ACT). Now in version 5.5, ACT has been around for some time, and it is designed to help identify and mitigate potential issues with application portfolios. ACT works by taking an inventory of your existing applications and analyzing them to determine if they will be compatible with Windows 7. Once the applications have been analyzed, there are a few different approaches for mitigation. One is to use the ACT shims to get the applications to run. Another option is to utilize Windows XP Mode on Windows 7. This should make the transition to Windows 7 much easier for most organizations, as well as prevent downtime for your end users.

As we have discussed in the past, enforcing least privilege is a critical part of your security posture, and the move to Windows 7 presents organizations with an opportunity to finally move to the least privilege model. While the Application Compatibility Toolkit has the ability to identify Windows 7 Application Compatiblity problems, it does not identify Least Privilege Application Compatibility. Not only do organizations want to know what applications are compatible with Windows 7, but they also want to know what apps will not run properly when a user is not an administrator.

For more information on ACT, take a look at the Microsoft Springboard Series videos, they are an excellent resource for making the transition to Windows 7.  Click here for a whitepaper on Win 7 Migration and Least Privilege.

 

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Additional articles

How To Implement The Australian Signals Directorate’s Top 4 Strategies

Posted October 20, 2014    Morey Haber

The Australian Signals Directorate (ASD), also known as the Defence Signals Directorate, has developed a list of strategies to mitigate targeted cyber intrusions. The recommended strategies were developed through ASD’s extensive experience in operational cyber security, including responding to serious security intrusions and performing vulnerability assessments and penetration testing for Australian government agencies. These recommendations…

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Exploiting MS14-059 because sometimes XSS is fun, sometimes…

Posted October 17, 2014    BeyondTrust Research Team

This October, Microsoft has provided a security update for System.Web.Mvc.dll which addresses a ‘Security Feature Bypass’. The vulnerability itself is in ASP.NET MVC technology and given its wide adoption we thought we would take a closer look. Referring to the bulletin we can glean a few useful pieces of information: “A cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability exists…

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Four Best Practices for Passing Privileged Account Audits

Posted October 16, 2014    Chris Burd

Like most IT organizations, your team may periodically face the “dreaded” task of being audited. Your process for delegating privileged access to desktops, servers, and infrastructure devices is a massive target for the auditor’s microscope. An audit’s findings can have significant implications on technology and business strategy, so it’s critical to make sure you’re prepared…

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