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Security in Context: The BeyondTrust Blog

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Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

Layoffs May Lead to Insider Attacks

Posted January 31, 2012    Peter McCalister

Employee terminations are, unfortunately, a necessary evil for corporations. In a time of recession, layoffs are more copious and often leave those affected angry and upset. It should come as no surprise that a small minority of those cases has led to disastrous consequences for former employers because of some terminated employee backlash.

Just recently, Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Institute of Engineering program, The CERT Insider Threat Center, analyzed more than 600 cases of actual malicious insider attacks and published a report on their findings around behavioral modeling titled, “Insider Threat Control: Using Centralized Logging to Detect Data Exfiltration Near Insider Termination. ”Interestingly, according to the report, “Many insiders who stole their organization’s intellectual property stole at least some of it within 30 days of their termination.”

Employee terminations are just one factor when combating insider threats. KPMG also recently released a report titled, “Who is the typical fraudster?,” indicating that companies were not seeing the red flags when it came to insider threats. According to KPMG’s analysis of 348 cases across 69 countries from 2008 to 2010 that were investigated on behalf of its clients, the typical “fraudster” is described as:

• A 36-45 year old male in a senior management role in the finance unit or in a finance-related function
• An employee for more than 10 years who usually would work in collusion with another individual

We at BeyondTrust believe insiders like Disgruntled Dave can be thwarted when an organization implements a least privilege environment to help secure their perimeter within. Whether we like it or not, people can do bad things intentionally, accidentally, or indirectly, and it is our responsibility to take measures to prevent this.

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Making Windows Endpoints the Least of your Worries

Posted September 2, 2015    Nick Cavalancia

We’re all concerned that someday an external hacker will try to gain access to your company’s critical data and systems. The problem? Your endpoints – both your workstations and servers – bypass (and often leave) the safety and security of your environment daily.

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Why Customers Choose PowerBroker: Low Total Cost of Ownership

Posted September 2, 2015    Scott Lang

In a survey of more than 100 customers, those customers indicated that BeyondTrust’s low powerbroker-difference-2total cost of ownership was a competitive differentiator versus other options in the privileged account management market.

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Passwords: A Hacker’s Best Friend

Posted September 1, 2015    Larry Brock

After all the years of talk about biometrics and multi-factor authentication, we still have passwords and will likely have them for a long time. Because many “high risk” systems require complex passwords (zk7&@1c6), most people that use them believe their passwords are secure. But they aren’t.

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