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Security in Context: The BeyondTrust Blog

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Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

If I Duck My Head Under This Blankie, The Monsters Can’t Get Me

Posted January 11, 2012    Peter McCalister

Remember when we were kids and we’d hear a strange noise from the other room, or the closet. Maybe it was after your parents finally let you watch that movie you promised wouldn’t give you nightmares. Back then nothing could get us, so long as we hid under out blankets. But we had to do it right, you couldn’t even have a pinky showing, otherwise, it wouldn’t work and we would have been taken away to work as slaves for the boogie man.

We’re all a little older now and the days of hiding under the blanket are over, although I will admit there still can be no space between my chair and the ottoman; that just gives me the chills. But guess what? Somewhere along the line, YOU became the blanket. You became what everyone else uses, even if they don’t realize it, to ward off the flying demons, abominable snowmen, and clowns. What, we’re in the trust tree here, you and I both know clowns can be freaky, the kind of freaky that only an 1/8” thick piece of cotton can protect us from. Of course, the adult version of these are Viruses, Trojans, Phishing Attacks, Key Loggers, Data Breaches, Theft…the list goes on. Some of these threats start from outside your network, but a growing number, (70%+) originate from inside your perimeter.

So how you gonna handle it? Will you be part of a blanket, half a blanket, maybe a little more? Either way, unless you can cover up your end-users completely, the things that go bump in the night are getting through. So with everyone in your ear and in your email telling you this and selling you that, how do we know what makes us an entire blanket? It starts with something you already have, knowledge. By now, especially if you’ve been following this blog, you know the single biggest security measure you can take is to run your user base with standard user rights, or at least limit what the almighty ‘root’ can do and when they can do it. Not doing this is like trying to sew a blanket without thread. You have no stitching to show the auditors and everything just falls apart.

The point is, to be the blanket, yes, we need good AV, Firewall, and Security Policies in place but in order to really secure the perimeter within, we need to limit users’ access, understand how data flows in our organizations, monitor database activity, and we need the ability to report on all of this. BeyondTrust is your pattern to create that blanket. We provide the tools you need do all this and more, while keeping end-user’s productivity a top priority. Give us call and let us show you first hand. Then, once you do this, maybe someone out there can tell me why my dogs keep staring at nothing and barking, and I swear a voice keeps telling me to geeett ouuuuut. Where’s my blanket?

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Additional articles

asp-mvc

Exploiting MS14-059 because sometimes XSS is fun, sometimes…

Posted October 17, 2014    BeyondTrust Research Team

This October, Microsoft has provided a security update for System.Web.Mvc.dll which addresses a ‘Security Feature Bypass’. The vulnerability itself is in ASP.NET MVC technology and given its wide adoption we thought we would take a closer look. Referring to the bulletin we can glean a few useful pieces of information: “A cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability exists…

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Four Best Practices for Passing Privileged Account Audits

Posted October 16, 2014    Chris Burd

Like most IT organizations, your team may periodically face the “dreaded” task of being audited. Your process for delegating privileged access to desktops, servers, and infrastructure devices is a massive target for the auditor’s microscope. An audit’s findings can have significant implications on technology and business strategy, so it’s critical to make sure you’re prepared…

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Bad POODLE, Don’t Bite!

Posted October 16, 2014    BeyondTrust Research Team

Researchers at Google (Bodo Moller, Thai Duong, and Krzysztof Kotowicz) have discovered that the encryption schemes used by SSL 3.0 are exploitable (CVE-2014-3566). Although the majority of web servers implement Transport Layer Security (TLS), the majority of clients will downgrade to SSL 3.0 in an attempt to maintain interoperability between protocols. For example, when a…

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