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Getting Retina Data into Splunk

Posted March 21, 2014    Jason Williams

SIEM products do a great job correlating information from a laundry list of security and operational solutions in order to gain visibility and context within an IT environment. Today we are going to show how to forward Retina Network security data into Splunk to help improve visibility and decision making. This integration can be completed in two simple steps.

Step 1

The first step you need to configure is on the Retina Network Security Scanner itself (RNSS). Once you have logged onto RNSS, go to the top menu -> Tools -> Alerting.

See the screenshot below:

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Once you click on the ‘Alerting’ option, you will see the following ‘Events’ list:

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The ‘events’ list is where you define what information you want Retina Network Scanner to send over to Splunk. In my case here, I am sending over “Medium Risk Audit” as well as “High Risk Audit” alerts. With these options selected, anytime Retina Network Scanner performs a vulnerability scan, anytime it discovers a High or Medium Risk audit, it will send that information over to my Splunk server.

Once you have selected the events you want RNS to send over, click on the ‘Actions’ tab as seen in this screenshot:

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In this section of the ‘alerting’ process, we are going to focus on the ‘SYSLOG’ section.
The syslog section is where we are going to configure RNS to send our data over to our Splunk box via SYSLOG.
Make sure you define the following sections in the SYSLOG section:

Enabled: True   (This enables RNS to send data over via syslog)
Host:     <IP address or hostname of splunkbox>  — This is where RNSS is going to send the data to
Priority: By default, you can keep this as “LOG_INFO”. This should be sufficient to get our data into Splunk.
Facility: This can also be kept as “LOG_LOCAL0”.

Once you have completed these steps on RNS, we have completed all we need to do on the Retina side.
The next step is to configure Splunk to accept data from our RNSS.

Step 2

Once you have the data in Splunk, you can use Splunk’s searching capabilities to sort through the data forwarded from that Retina Network Scanner.

Setting up Splunk is pretty straightforward. We are going to setup Splunk to accept SYSLOG activity via UDP on port 514 (standard syslog port).
There are several ways to set this up in Splunk. Here is a one way to setup the connection in Splunk:

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Once you have Splunk accepting SYSLOG logs over UDP port 514, you can now start sending Retina Scan information to Splunk. Once you have ran your vulnerability scans, that data will now be consumed by Splunk, allowing you to view, sort and filter on the Vulnerability data.

Here is a screenshot of all the data that has been sent over to Splunk from RNSS.

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 Here is another screenshot where we are focusing specifically on the host, 192.168.47.110:

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Here is one more example of sorting on a vulnerability and finding it on multiple hosts. In the below example, I am focusing on “Mozilla” vulnerabilities and as we can see from the results returned back, I have two machines that have this known vulnerability:

192.168.47.141
192.168.47.110

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Now that you have successfully configured RNSS (Retina Network Security Scanner) to send vulnerability scan information to Splunk, it is very easy and flexible to search through the data and find information very quickly.

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