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Security in Context: The BeyondTrust Blog

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Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

Firewalls Not Preventing Data Breaches? Try a Dose of Least Privilege

Posted April 4, 2012    Peter McCalister

An article was published last month indicating a malware-infected computer at ConnecticutCollege was the cause of the breach of 18,000 social security numbers of teachers, employees, and student workers. According to the report, “a computer in the CCSU business office was infected in December, and sat on the system for eight days before it was detected and removed.” By now we all know that data breaches are bad. We understand the ramifications of lost/manipulated/stolen data. We know they should be avoided at all costs. So why do they keep happening?

Maybe it’s because IT organizations aren’t treating the root cause of the problem. Since we led with the Connecticut College incident, let’s use it as an example. I’m sure there were extensive firewalls protecting the sensitive information of those 18,000 people. I have no doubt that a lot of thought and planning went into the anti-malware software that was supposedly protecting the corporate network. But what happens when that’s not enough? Firewalls and anti-malware software are just Band-Aids when it comes to treating IT security as a whole. While they help by placing a barrier between the outside world and the goings on of the corporate network, they don’t actually treat or solve the cause of why the breaches are occurring in the first place.

Unmanaged and unaudited administrative credentials and root access are at the cause of data breaches. Bottom line. These credentials can be hijacked by malware and allow hacks to occur in otherwise secure corporate networks. To properly treat the problems that cause data breaches, these credentials MUST be managed. Users must have access to tasks necessary for job functionality, but not too many that they can access anything at any time. When this kind of freedom is allowed your users, malware can take hold and your data becomes insecure. Fortunately, BeyondTrust can help. Click here for more information on ways to manage administrative credentials the right way and reduce the threat of malware in your organization.

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New Analyst SWOT Assessment Identifies Key Strengths of PowerBroker

Posted November 24, 2014    Scott Lang

Following on the heels of the Gartner PAM market guide and Frost & Sullivan review of Password Safe comes a new analyst review of our BeyondInsight and PowerBroker platforms, a SWOT assessment of BeyondTrust written by Ovum. Ovum’s honest and thorough review of BeyondTrust indicates that we are delivering, “…an integrated, one-stop approach to PAM….

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Patented Windows privilege management brings you unmatched benefits

Posted November 24, 2014    Scott Lang

We are pleased to announce that BeyondTrust has been granted a new U.S. Patent (No. 8,850,549) for privilege management, validating our approach to helping our customers achieve least privilege in Windows environments. The methods and systems that we employ for controlling access to resources and privileges per process are unique to BeyondTrust PowerBroker for Windows….

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A Quick Look at MS14-068

Posted November 20, 2014    BeyondTrust Research Team

Microsoft recently released an out of band patch for Kerberos.  Taking a look at the Microsoft security bulletin, it seems like there is some kind of issue with Kerberos signatures related to tickets. Further information is available in the Microsoft SRD Blogpost So it looks like there is an issue with PAC signatures.  But what…

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