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Security in Context: The BeyondTrust Blog

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Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

Data Lost: Covering Your Assets

Posted May 4, 2012    Peter McCalister

According to a recent CDW poll, one in four organizations experienced data loss in the past two years. Imagine the amount of customer, student, employee and patient information lost because of those incidents, never mind the ones that go unreported.

Aligning with this shocking stat is that according to the same study, the number of people accessing business networks increased by 41 percent during the last two years. If we can learn anything from this stat, we must consider partners as potential insider threats too. Information assets are some of the most important ingredients to a corporation’s success, but also the hardest to effectively protect across the extended enterprise given the proliferation of distributed users’ communities, mobile devices, virtualized platforms and cloud computing.

While it is important to provide the information and access necessary for third-party resources to do their jobs, at the same time it’s irresponsible to allow vendors free reign over sensitive data or network assets. An all or nothing approach to granting users access doesn’t work here. Effective privileged identity management coupled with comprehensive knowledge of your partners’ and vendors’ security policies and practices is the best way to safeguard your company’s most valued assets.

A recent Ponemon Institute study discovered that organizations suffering a data loss in 2011 paid an average of $5.5 million per breach, which translates into $194 per record lost. Human nature is the weakest link when it comes to the intersection of people, processes and technology. You can’t rely on everyone being a saint or competent all of the time. It’s not just malicious employees’ intent on destroying information systems that can cause havoc, but also the negligent, misinformed, and downright nosey, who can compromise sensitive data. In most situations it’s more often than not the case that such people have way too much privileged access – admin rights on the desktop, root password on server – for the role they are required to play.

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Making Windows Endpoints the Least of your Worries

Posted September 2, 2015    Nick Cavalancia

We’re all concerned that someday an external hacker will try to gain access to your company’s critical data and systems. The problem? Your endpoints – both your workstations and servers – bypass (and often leave) the safety and security of your environment daily.

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Why Customers Choose PowerBroker: Low Total Cost of Ownership

Posted September 2, 2015    Scott Lang

In a survey of more than 100 customers, those customers indicated that BeyondTrust’s low powerbroker-difference-2total cost of ownership was a competitive differentiator versus other options in the privileged account management market.

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Passwords: A Hacker’s Best Friend

Posted September 1, 2015    Larry Brock

After all the years of talk about biometrics and multi-factor authentication, we still have passwords and will likely have them for a long time. Because many “high risk” systems require complex passwords (zk7&@1c6), most people that use them believe their passwords are secure. But they aren’t.

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