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Bringing you news and commentary on solutions and strategies for protecting critical IT infrastructure in the context of your business.

Balancing Administrator Privileges for Help Desk Savings

Posted February 23, 2012    Peter McCalister

Next week I will be attending the RSA Conference in San Francisco. As a product management professional who enjoys investigating innovative emerging technologies, I decided to see what a few of the pre-show pundits had to say about the upcoming conference.

I just finished listening to a Search Security podcast that discussed what the speakers will believe the hot topics at the show. The title of the podcast was “The Erosion of Trust”. I was intrigued by the title because I believe any successful information security program must include technical controls that align the business value of corporate information with the trust level of individuals that have access to that data. Although their proposed hot topics (which included consumerism, hacktevism, and mobile security) are all great information security topics, I struggle to connect the dots with the advertised topic. The only exception is the observation that because of “consumerism”, where the lines are diminishing between work and play internet activity, that everyone should ensure they trust the people you do business with on the web. CAll be naive, but isn’t have knowledge of those you do business with, whether on the web or not, just a common sense thing? My cynical view is that this is just a way for a few of the legacy consumer security products to put some life back into their lackluster product portfolios. I believe the podcasters really missed an opportunity to discuss a topic that I also believe will be hot at RSA this year- protecting valuable data from perceived trusted insiders that take advantage of this established trust for their own personal financial gain. I am relatively new to BeyondTrust, and to their least privilege solutions, but I have had the privilege over the last few months to talk to a lot of enterprise customers. I’ve learned that concern over the threat of trusted insiders is top of mind for many large organizations.

For the last 8 or so years I have been active in the security information and event management (SIEM) market, where a popular catch phrase was “you can’t manage what you can’t measure”. Looking out at the least privilege landscape I am also learning that organizations “can’t secure what they can’t control”. In my opinion having technologies that act as a control gate between trusted employees and high value information they access will become increasingly important. I look forward to seeing whether my thoughts that products that protect against insider threat will also emerge as a hot topic at the conference. Check back in a few days and I’ll let you know what I learned.

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Additional articles

Are Your Data Security Efforts Focused in the Right Area?

Posted January 28, 2015    Scott Lang

Vormetric Data Security recently released an insider threat report, with research conducted by HarrisPoll and analyzed by Ovum. Based on the survey responses, it is apparent that there is still a great deal of insecurity over data. However, the results also show that there may be misplaced investments to address those insecurities. I will explain…

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GHOST Vulnerability…Scary Indeed

Posted January 28, 2015    BeyondTrust Research Team

A vulnerability discovered by Qualys security researchers has surfaced within the GNU C Library that affects virtually all Linux operating systems. The vulnerability lies within the various gethostbyname*() functions and, as such, has been dubbed “GHOST.” GHOST is particularly nasty considering remote, arbitrary code execution can be achieved. In an effort to avoid taxing DNS lookups, glibc developers introduced…

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Your New Years Resolution: Controlling Privileged Users

Posted January 27, 2015    Dave Shackleford

Is 2015 the year you get a better handle on security? The news last year was grim – so much so, in fact, that many in the information security community despaired a bit. Really, the end-of-the-year infosec cocktail parties were a bit glum. OK, let’s be honest, infosec cocktail parties are usually not that wild…

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